The Challenge to Make Chocolate Child Labor Free 1, 2, & 3

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Nestle Chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe Skeptical of Growth in Organic Food Market

Recap of Fast Company Article (source link at bottom):

“Nestle Chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe says he realizes farmer’s markets are shifting American approach to produce and food production and that Nestle is investing more money in life sciences and the intersection of medicine and nutrition because its executives believe that how we eat plays role in chronic diseases.

“He’s skeptical of the slow (organic) food movement being able to feed the world but says it’s affected Nestle’s approach to supply chain as consumers demand to know where their food comes from. Nestle’s improved its identification and tracking of the source of food products. ‘This is a positive development,’ Brabeck-Letmathe said. Nestlé says is helps farmers of cocoa, coffee, and milk install control mechanisms to prevent contamination and improve production quality.

“Organic Monitor estimates global sales of organic foods $54.9 billion in 2009, up from $50.9 billion in 2008.  Largest markets are U.S., Germany, and France. Organic Trade Association reports U.S. sales of organic food and beverages up from $1 billion in 1990 to $26.7 billion in 2010. 2010 sales represented 7.7 percent growth over 2009. Organic sales approximately 4 percent of overall food and beverage sales in 2010. But Brabeck-Letmathe thinks the growth of the elite, wealthier organic food consumers in U.S. and E.U. have peaked. “It will stay the same,” he says. “I don’t think it will grow much more than it is.”

I read stuff like this and think “Yep, HE’S crazy!” He’s helping coffee and cocoa farmers? Only the ones using slaves and toxic chemicals!!  Exploring the intersection between chronic diseases and food…my what a NOVEL idea. Let’s throw in the chemicals and the genetic modification Nestles does on their garbage food that they make billions on…while the world gets sicker. He WANTS the organic / healthy food movement to peak because more and more of us are letting people know just how ROTTEN “convenience” food really is!

But Nestles is doubly evil…child slaves AND poison. I think that people like this man…who KNOWS that his corporations use child slave labor, who KNOWS that his company pushing formula into 3rd world countries has actually INCREASED infant deaths, and KNOWS that the food they push is toxic…yeah, I can’t help but think “evil” when I read his words (look him up on YouTube…listening to him gave me the creeps.)

What’s so awful when you think about it is that organic IS more expensive. Until you get the doctor’s bills…then fake, GMO, chemical filled foods suddenly become a gazillion times MORE expensive than food the way God intended. Spend the extra $$ on organic and Fair Trade food, coffee, chocolate, etc.  It’s worth the price! I heard someone says once: “Shop on the edges of the grocery stores…stay out of the middle where the processed food is. The perimeter has the fruit, veggies, meat, dairy and breads.”  

I personally drink and buy organic 100% Fair Trade coffee through Our Mission Coffee (click to view their site.)

Folgers, Maxwell House, Nescafe, Taster’s Choice…NONE of those brands will ever get my business again!  Read our other post about Peter Brabeck-Letmathe’s view on child labor…disgusting!

BY PAUL GLADER | Fast Company | Sun Aug 21, 2011 >> Read Full Article

What’s the Difference Between Fair Trade, Sustainable and Organic?

Fair trade is an organized social movement and market-based approach that aims to help producers in developing countries make better trading conditions and promote sustainability. The movement advocates the payment of a higher price to producers as well as higher social and environmental standards. It focuses in particular on exports from developing countries to developed countries, most notably handicrafts, coffee, cocoa, sugar, tea, bananas, honey, cotton, wine, fresh fruit, chocolate, flowers and gold.

Sustainable agriculture is the practice of farming using principles of ecology, the study of relationships between organisms and their environment. It has been defined as follows: An integrated system of plant and animal production practices having a site-specific application that will last over the long term:

  • Satisfy human food and fiber needs
  • Make the most efficient use of non-renewable resources and on-farm resources and integrate, where appropriate, natural biological cycles and controls
  • Sustain the economic viability of farm operations
  • Enhance the quality of life for farmers and society as a whole.

Sustainable agriculture in the United States was addressed by the 1990 farm bill. More recently, as consumer and retail demand for sustainable products has risen, organizations such as Food Alliance and Protected Harvest have started to provide measurement standards and certification programs for what constitutes a sustainably grown crop.

Sustainability issues are generally expressed in scientific and environmental terms, as well as in ethical terms of stewardship, but implementing change is a social challenge that entails, among other things, international and national law, urban planning and transport, local and individual lifestyles and ethical consumerism. “The relationship between human rights and human development, corporate power and environmental justice, global poverty and citizen action, suggest that responsible global citizenship is an inescapable element of what may at first glance seem to be simply matters of personal consumer and moral choice.”

Organic farming is the form of agriculture that relies on techniques such as crop rotation, green manure, compost and biological pest control to maintain soil productivity and control pests on a farm. Organic farming excludes or strictly limits the use of manufactured fertilizers, pesticides (which include herbicides, insecticides and fungicides), plant growth regulators such as hormones, livestock antibiotics, food additives, and genetically modified organisms.  

Organic agricultural methods are internationally regulated and legally enforced by many nations, based in large part on the standards set by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), an international umbrella organization for organic farming organizations established in 1972.

IFOAM defines the overarching goal of organic farming as:  “Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic agriculture combines tradition, innovation and science to benefit the shared environment and promote fair relationships and a good quality of life for all involved..”  — International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements

Since 1990, the market for organic products has grown from nothing, reaching $55 billion in 2009 according to Organic Monitor (www.organicmonitor.com). This demand has driven a similar increase in organically managed farmland. Approximately 37,000,000 hectares (91,000,000 acres) worldwide are now farmed organically, representing approximately 0.9 percent of total world farmland (2009).


The next page is from an article about tea but I thought a lot of what I put below would help people understand the difference between organic and sustainable and Fair Trade.  The first few lines I put in bold because I want people to understand the dangers of toxic chemicals in coffee!  >> View Page 2

Fair Trade Products Growing Faster Than Conventional Products

Change.org
by Tim Newman · December 02, 2010

A report released last month by the UN found that markets for sustainable products have grown rapidly over the past five years and are growing faster than conventional products. At the same time, it is important to ensure that products claiming to respond to the demand for worker-friendly and sustainable production are living up to consumers’ expectations and that conditions are verified by independent monitors with integrity. The ratings of certification systems created by Free2Work.org are a good place to start in understanding how different third party certifications address labor rights issues. Another recent report by a Belgian consumer interest organization also analyzes many of the major certification systems operating in the cocoa industry and found that Fair Trade stands out for its focus directly on farmers and for providing economic support to farmers to successfully implement sustainable production.  (source)

U.N. Report Says Sustainable Product Markets Growing Rapidly

REUTERS
Wed Nov 17, 2010 7:00am GMT

GENEVA Nov 17 (Reuters) – Markets for sustainable products, such as those with the Fairtrade label, have expanded rapidly over the past five years and are growing much faster than those for conventional goods, a U.N.-backed report said on Wednesday.

* Growth in sustainable products outpaces conventional goods

* Sales of certified sustainable coffee more than quintupled in the period to 392,347 tonnes in 2009 — representing more than 8 percent of global coffee exports and 17 percent of global production — from 73,602 tonnes in 2004;

* Sustainable cocoa sales more than tripled to 46,896 tonnes in 2008 — 1.2 percent of global sales — from 13,473 tonnes in 2003.  >>Read Full Story<<